Akita Club of America

The Akita Club of America is a member of the American Kennel Club and, as such, is the only National Akita Breed Club which is recognized and sanctioned by the AKC. The main objectives of the Akita Club of America are the preservation and protection of the breed and improvement of the character and conformation of the Akita as described in the official breed standard.

About the Akita

A natural monument in Japan, the Akita’s proud heritage includes hunting large game such as bear, elk, and boar. This powerful and dignified member of the Working Group is renowned for courage and loyalty, but may not be tolerant of other animals. His luxurious double coat can include any combination of vibrant colors. Aloof toward strangers, they form strong family bonds. Highly intelligent with keen sense of humor, the Akita responds best to respectful commands and training techniques that rely on motivation rather than force. Strong-willed and proud, Akitas are not receptive to abusive methods. Akitas originated in Japan many, many years ago, and have been designated a natural monument of Japan. They are a large, impressive breed with natural guarding instincts. While generally reserved with people they don’t know, Akitas are affectionate with their family. They tend to be independent, and while they will always know where you are in your home, they do not need constant attention as do some of the more dependent breeds. For more about this amazing breed, please spend some time here at our site. There’s a wonderful world to explore.
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Senior Akita Care

This section of the website is devoted to the care and understanding of our beloved Akitas once they reach their "Golden Years"

Living with a Senior Pet - How old is your pet?

Dog Human
SMALL BREED MEDIUM BREED LARGE BREED
 1 yr 15 yrs 15 yrs 15 yrs
 2 24 24 24
 3 28 28 28
 4 32 32 32
 5 36 36 36
 6 40 42 45
 7 44 47 50
 8 48 51 55
 9 48 51 61
 10 52 56 72
 11 60 65 77
 12 64 69 82
 13 68 74 88
 14 72 78 93
 15 76 83 120
 16 80 87
 17 84 92
 18 88 96
 19 92 101

Dogs age much quicker than you and I. Their development from puberty to adulthood takes place over a period of 18-24 months (vs about 21 years in people). After that time, each year of a pet's life is equal to about 4 years of a human life (not 7 years as is commonly thought). The average life span of a dog is about 13 years (small to mid size dog).

To improve/maintain the quality of your older pet's life, it's important to recognize "aging" problems early and to manage these before they become bigger problems.

Senior pets are precious members of your family. Regular checkups, proper nutrition, grooming and exercise, and some minor home and environmental modifications or restrictions can help keep the senior pet healthy and safe for years to come.

A "baseline" blood and urine profile is highly recommended once your pet reaches the age of 7. This gives you an excellent baseline as to your pet's current health and serves as a benchmark for any changes that develop over the years.

Aging is influenced by your pet's:

  • size and breed (smaller pets tend to live longer).
  • environment (outdoor, free roaming pets are at greater risk of infectious disease and trauma like being hit by a car).
  • nutritional status (obese pets have some significant health risks).
  • disease status (diseases of vital organs like the heart, lung, kidney and liver are more common in the older pet as these organs are prone to wear and tear as they age).

Senior Checklist

BE PREPARED! The following questions will help you and your veterinarian provide the best care for your older pet. Check if your pet has experienced changes in:

  1. Drinking
  2. Urination
  3. Appetite
  4. Weight
  5. Hair coat (itchy, dandruff, dull, hair loss)
  6. Mobility (lameness, trouble with stairs, stiff, in pain)
  7. Breathing (coughing, shortness of breath, exercise intolerance)
  8. Digestion (vomiting, diarrhea, constipation)
  9. Senses (hearing, smelling or vision loss)
  10. Behavior (reduced family interaction, increased vocalization, loss of house training, etc.)
  11. Growths (new growths, changes in previous growths)